Walford Mill Crafts, Knobcrook Road, off Stone Lane, Wimborne, Dorset, BH21 1NL
01202 841400  info@walfordmillcrafts.co.uk

Exhibitions

 

2020

Stephen and Holly Yates, Artists and Ceramicists

Sunday March 1st 2020 - Sunday March 29th 2020

Since 2016, Stephen and Holly have worked together responding to their local environment in a variety of media. They are hugely inspired by the unique coastlines of their home of Portland. Together they have exhibited all over Dorset and held open studios events each year. They worked together as artists in residence in New South Wales, Australia in 2017.

Stephen’s paintings are mainly produced en plein air in acrylics worked largely with a palette knife, or in watercolour. He produces both hand-built and wheel-thrown ceramics in his home studio pottery. He also teaches regularly in watercolours, acrylics, plein air painting and ceramics. He is a design teacher at Sunninghill School, Dorchester.

Holly explores the extremes of what textiles can be, by innovative and experimental work combining fibre with ceramic clays and acrylic media, and layering shadow embroidery on sheer fabrics with other works. Drawing is at the core of all her work. She has been part of a recent book published by Dorset Visual Arts “Drawing On Dorset” with an accompanying touring exhibition. She is a member of Wessex Contemporary Artists (WESCA), She also works more commercially in printmaking and fabric pattern design, and is also a general medical practitioner.

stephen.yates@btinternet.com
www.stephenyatesartist.com
FB @arti2.co.uk
IG @stephen_yates_artist

info@holly-yates.com
www.holly-yates.com
FB @hollyyatesart
IG @holly_yates_art


Sandie Roche - Weaver, Rugs. Chris Legge - Specialist in all manner of woodwork.

Saturday 1st February 2020 - Saturday 29th February 2020

Sandie Roche

I have always loved textiles and learnt to sew, knit and crochet at an early age. I made my first piece of loom weaving at school when I was 14, a cot blanket. I still have it. I wanted to do A level weaving, but being at a grammar school, was not allowed to. I continued my weaving at college where I studied general textiles and became a primary school teacher.

In 1975 I discovered the Handweavers Studio in Walthamstow, London and for a couple of years I had a sort of apprenticeship whereby they taught me in return for me working in the gallery and shop. I used to sit in the window at a floor loom and weave, this is when I began to take commissions. For the first few years I made cloth and having done a City and Guilds dress design course, made up my cloth into simple garments, jackets, duffle coats, blouses that were quite fashionable in the 70s and early 80s.

I started to make rugs and had a few disasters in the early days when I didn’t plan / design well enough and undid whole pieces of work! A steep learning process. During the last 40 years I have woven a variety of rugs, blankets, wallhangings, throws and scarves, not to mention cushions. I have exhibited in London and most of the Home Counties. Living in Hampshire for 25 years I was a member of the Hampshire and Berkshire Guild of Craftsmen , and for a few years, the exhibitions coordinator.

During all this time I have taught weaving. Firstly in London, full days in Adult Education, then privately at home to fit in with children. Now living in Wiltshire, I teach a class of tapestry weavers once a week at home in Bradford on Avon, and once a month in Frome. They do beautiful work.

My work is hugely influenced by colour, and inspiration comes from my surroundings, whether walking along the river Avon in the morning, or the fabulous terracotta and stone towns of Italy, Spanish tiles, or wherever we are travelling. I try to teach my students to really look at nature, to interpret the colours that they see. In my own work, I 8use the layers of colour in the landscape to design my rugs. Sometimes, though , I just put colours together for the joy of colour.

I weave on a Swedish loom that I have had since 1982. It is hand and foot operated, no other power. The loom has 4 shafts and a weaving width of 150cm.

Chris Legge

Chris is an artisan craftsman working primarily with wood. He uses materials from the natural world seeing beauty in things others might see as decaying. Influenced by the arts and crafts movement he uses fine joinery and organic materials and an artistic approach to his designs.

His first training was in Scotland as an unpaid apprentice working for carpenter and antique furniture restorer Les Johnson. Les was in his late 80s and was unfortunately losing his sight and ability to work, so Chris became his eyes, ears and hands. Chris eventually took over the business aged 19.

In the mid-90s Chris made the move to Dorset to be with family and carried on with restorative work in stately homes estates across Dorset.

In 2017 Chris took on a former rotary dairy and has lovingly renovated it into a beautiful studio/workshop. Chris is happy to take on commissions and is also planning to create an educational space.

Photo: Chris in his studio. Photography Asher Bassford


Manda Beeching - At the edge of the village

With ceramics by Richard Wilson and Eeles Pottery

January 2020

I am a painter and printmaker with a life long love of colour and texture, I use acrylic paints and linocut prints to explore the themes of landscape and still life. I mostly work from memory and imagination with reference to the sketches and colour studies that I make on site.

I am very fortunate to have a studio in the south of Spain overlooking the Guadiana river and this collection of paintings reflects the countryside and small white villages that are typical of the area. I hope that they will add a touch of colour and warmth to the cold January days.

See more of Manda's work - Facebook: mandabeechingpainter, Instagram: @manda.beeching

 

Richard Wilson


Richard is based in West Bay, on the Jurassic Coast of Dorset.

He is inspired by the rhythms of the local landscape with it’s rolling hills and pebble beaches, and by the colours and patterns of the sea and coastline. He mixes his own colours and glazes, echoing many traditions of slipware from England and Europe. As a member of several pottery associations including Professional Member of the Craft Potters Association and ex chairman of the West Country Potters Association, he has been selected over the years for many ceramic fairs here in England and in Europe.

See more of Richard's work - Facebook: Richard-Wilson-Ceramics, web: rwilson-ceramics.co.uk

 

 

 

Eeles Pottery

 

Family run pottery based in Mosterton, West Dorset, specialising in copper fumed raku & naked crackle raku pots.

The pottery is set in an old 17th century coaching inn where the family work in partnership to produce an extensive range of pottery, mainly Stoneware with some Porcelain and Raku. The Stoneware and Porcelain is fired in a three chambered oriental type dragon kiln. The Raku is fired in a small cross draft wood fired kiln, lifted out with tongs and then flamed on sawdust. This gives the rainbow colours on the pots. The Raku is fired to 1000 degrees, the Stoneware and Porcelain to 1280 degrees centigrade.

See more of the Eeles' work - Facebook: RainbowRaku, web: eelespottery.co.uk